It’s Not That Hard: Risotto

Risotto was not a part of my vocabulary until maybe the mid 1980s, around the same time I learned about food processors and decent coffee. Suddenly these foods appeared in the mainstream American food supply without warning or explanation, as did kiwi, kumquats, and more recently, kale. Topic for a future post, I think.

The book that showed me that I need not fear risotto.
The book that showed me that I need not fear risotto.

By the time I tried risotto, it was pretty well established among the cognoscenti. I loved it, and had to learn how to make it. Word on the street held that it was tricky, fussy, and easy to ruin. Still, I needed to try.

The recipe is basic, and endlessly versatile. It’s true that this dish requires attention—it’s not a “set it and forget it” affair. But the attention is not fussy or difficult—add liquid a half-cup at a time and stir.

Vary the cheese, the vegetable, the broth; add meat at the end if you like; mix two or more cheeses; add different spices. It’s pretty difficult to make this inedible.

All you need to know about proportions and categories of ingredients for risotto.
All you need to know about proportions and categories of ingredients for risotto

 

Mark Bittman provided a further revelation—that pasta could be cooked à la risotto! His article in the New York Times in 2009, Allowing Pasta to Drink Its Fill, lays it all out, with his usual tips on how to vary the recipe to suit your taste and what you might have on hand in your fridge.

 

 

Author: Susan

Writer, editor, rower, runner, yogi, enthusiastic eater. Interests: nutrition & physical activity; real food; good writing.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *